Skip to main content

The opening salvo should include a right hook:

Many years ago, in the proud nation of Murka, good King Richard found it wise to retire after embarrassing photos came to light.

[We see pictures of wise King Richard (could be a middle aged cousin of Harrison Ford) in enlightenment era royal garb, messily eating a chocolate cake, his face covered in frosting.]

KING RICHARD-- [looking at the photos]  I don't see why I should put up with this!  Screw 'em all, anyway.

[Newspaper headline: DICK TO RETIRE, SPEND TIME WITH FAMILY]

KING RICHARD-- [boarding a plane, carrying a suitcase, wearing sunglasses, cargo shorts, and a Hawaiian shirt] Have fun, Johnny!

And so the king's frivolous brother, John, ascended the throne.

KING JOHN-- [dressed in designer jeans and an overpriced polo; a young dandy with affectations of being an everyday guy; looks like a young Harrison Ford; slouching on throne, tipping crown to a jaunt] This hat is ostentatious.  Bring me a baseball cap, some coke, and a cheap beer.  Does this place have pay-per-view?

Thus Murka fell into a period of laissez faire capitalism, tended (quite loosely) and abetted (rather vigorously) by King John's Prime Minister, Edward 'Money' Banks.  Edward was the former CEO, CFO, and COO of the kingdom's chief golf ball manufacturer.

ED-- [Dick Cheney without glasses; a rotund, bald, squinty-eyed suited fellow, sitting in a well appointed chair behind a neatly ordered, mahogany desk; always carries a cigar] We did pretty well with bobble heads, too.  [plays with bobble head of King John]  I've always made things to entertain people.  Now I can help the whole nation have fun.

Unfortunately, Edward only knew the well connected and fabulously wealthy.  The same held true for his friends.

ED-- If our policies hurt the poor, it isn't out of malice.  We're not monsters, just ignorant.  [taps cigar]  Every one is the hero of his own story.

Of course, this isn't Ed's story, but the tale of a young woman named Robin.
Next chapter

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

More Political Notes

-Rick Santorum seems a somewhat likeable guy who believes several crazy, distasteful things. It may not be helpful to say his ideas are nuts, but it still is less useful to fashion him an evil man because his discriminatory views don't jive with the left, centre, or centre-right in America.

-Calling a person a 'front runner' before votes are counted is just plain wrong.  Calling one a front-runner after some votes are counted is slightly misleading.  The race isn't about who the media thinks is ahead, and it is only indirectly about who gets the most votes.  What really matters is accruing the most delegates.  In the race for a major party's nomination for POTUS, the guy with the most delegates-who-will-actually-vote-for-him-at-their-national-convention is ahead. If no delegates have been awarded, there isn't really a front-runner, no matter what polls might say.

-I doubt the primary process will hurt the eventual Republican nominee for POTUS all that much.…

Pointless Ruminations on the Absurd

The world around us is in no way required to conform to our expectations, beliefs, or desires. Rather, it is all but guaranteed to disappoint us, at least once or twice a lifetime. The loftier (or more deeply felt) our ideals, the more this may be true.

When we accept this incongruity and are keenly aware of it, but cannot change our thinking, absurdity steps in. The world no longer quite makes sense. It is untethered from rational or moral concerns, adrift in a bizarre joke told by no one.
Desire for normative order is often irrational and misplaced. Placing ethical constraints on amoral matters makes no sense. Yet these appear (sometimes, seemingly) inescapable conclusions. Hence the sensation of absurdity.

We can apply these incongruous demands to anything and anyone. But this is not a universal philosophy. It is a philosophy of the self, a diagnosis.

Well now.

I think I'm going to try to revive my online writing habits, outside of Facebook.

And what have I been thinking or feeling in the interim, across the last couple years or so? Well, I'm glad you asked.

In part, this.